The Jokes Just Write Themselves

Imagine, if you will, Dildo Run Provincial Park located near Virgin Arm.

The jokes just write themselves…

In a Stream

Saturday we headed northwest to Dildo Run Provincial Park (near Virgin Arm). Yes, we did so solely for the name. We are (and by that I mean “I am,” since I was the driver) that mature. Also, it’s in iceberg alley, and the whales were coming in the bay, so we thought we might spy either or both.

Spoiler: We spotted neither.

The park is somewhat small (I think the first park we visited, Butter Pot, must be one of the bigger ones) but the shore is beautiful and you have a view of the New World Islands. We got a map and started the hike to Blackhead. (Newfoundland: We were named by people with a sense of humor.)

When we were near the end of the trail (and thus the viewing platform), Good Man stopped.

Look!

I walked up to the sign. “Arrrggggg!”

What?

Alright, I’m all for nesting hawks, but really? The park employees knew we were hiking. There was only one marked trail. They couldn’t’ve warned us that we wouldn’t reach our destination?

We started hiking back and wandered down to the shore and hiked that way back.

Good Man

The views were lovely (are any of the views not lovely in Newfoundland?), but Good Man really needs some real hiking boots. He keeps claiming he doesn’t need any, but these sneakers are just not doing it. I know boots are expensive, but good boots last a long time. And even if you don’t wear them daily, they’re worth the price. I might have to pull one of Mother’s ajumma tricks and just drag him to the store to buy some.

New World Islands

Slate

It’s Amazing Where Trees Grow

Hanging Out

We left Dildo Park and headed back to our self-catered cabins (the very lovely By d’ Bay Cabins). I poked around some side roads to take photos.

Near Wings Point

On the drive up I’d seen an old church falling apart. On the return trip, we stopped to look at it. I’m pretty sure the nearest town or village with a name was Wings Point. I assume, based on majority of the churches that I saw, that this was once an Anglican church.

The church was built at an angle to the shore, which I found a bit strange. Was it really built like that? Has the shore moved over time?

Old Church

To the right of the church there was another small structure with a cross on top. It looked a bit like a small lighthouse. I assume it once held church bells, but I didn’t get any good photos of it.

The Cove

The steeple was in poor shape, and the cross was so lightweight that the wind picked it up. There was a door open near the back that was storing junk. Windows were broken, but there was some furniture inside the church. Obviously, at some point, someone had access to the church. Across the street from this church there were occupied houses. A new Anglican church was down the street.

There were two headstones on the property. The first was for a nineteen-year old who died in 1905. (I think this stone is in great shape if it was really placed 100 years ago!) The second one was for a male six-day old who died in 1902. There’s a second name listed on that headstone, but I can’t read it well. I do know that it was a woman who died 13 days after the baby. Infant and mother? Influenza?

The church was at an angle to the shore and these two headstones also appeared rather haphazardly placed, compared to the rows of headstones I’m used to seeing.

Single Burial Headstone

Double Burial Headstone

A little past the church we found an abandoned store. Two men were in there working on it. Next to it we found this collapsing shed.

In Wings Point

The most interesting parts of Newfoundland have been the towns and villages on the shores. I’ve been getting a feeling for the retirement communities, for the communities that are losing citizens, for the communities trying to hang on, for the growing communities…